Vortex Razor AMG UH-1 vs. Eotech 512 [Review]

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This is the only Vortex Razor AMG UH-1 vs. Eotech 512 review you’ll ever have to read.

In fact:

I bought both holographic sights and hand-tested all the technical features: zeroing, reticle performance, durability, field of view, clarity, and so much more.

By the end of this review, you’ll which sight is perfect for you.

Let’s get started!


Vortex Razor AMG UH-1

In the holographic sight game, Vortex has been drawing a lot of attention.

In fact:

The Razor AMG UH-1, also called ‘The Huey,’ has become a popular and well-respected optic from Vortex.

It’s gained popularity for good reasons and is an excellent choice for your platform.

The only simple thing about this is the magnification: 1X.

Other than that, it’s an optic from the future.

Vortex Razor AMG UH-1

The first notable feature is the build quality.

It’s made from matte black high-quality aluminum.  The weight is 11.8 oz, which is a little heavy for an optic but not a dealbreaker. All the electronics are housed in the base. This is a new style for holographic sights called “Quantum Well Technology.”

It makes electronics more secure in the optic

The reticle is impressive.

It has a 1 MOA center dot with a ring around it. The ring has hash marks at the top, left, and right. There is a triangle at the bottom of the ring. The center dot can be zeroed from 25 to 400 yards and the triangle can be used for engagements up to 10 yards.

This adds to the versatility when operating. All while the optic is adjustable and each click of the turret is 0.5 MOA. 

The glass is equally as impressive.

The ocular lens is smaller than the objective lens to help eliminate that pesky tunnel vision. The glass is also multicoated and covered with Armortek protection. This makes it scratch-resistant and durable.

There is also an anti-reflective coating to prevent any glare off the lenses. The inside of the optic is argon purged, making it completely waterproof and fogproof.

It doesn’t stop there.

The battery it comes with is a CR123A disposable battery. There is a micro USB port on the side if you want to upgrade to an LFP123A rechargeable battery.

The optic does not come with the rechargeable battery, that must be bought separately. Another small but notable detail is that the micro USB port is waterproof, even if you leave the cover open. The optic will power down after 14 hours to conserve battery life.

Mounting this is easy as it has a quick release and fits standard picatinny rails or 1” weaver rails, just like the Sig Sauer Romeo red dot series.  

To top it all off, Vortex put a lifetime warranty on the Vortex Razor AMG UH-1. No need to save the receipt or fill anything out. If it breaks, send it out and Vortex will fix or replace it. 

Pros:

  • Rechargeable port
  • Waterproof/shockproof
  • Versatile reticle
  • Clear glass
  • Quantum Well Technology
  • Lifetime warranty

Cons:

  • Bulky
  • Does not come with rechargeable batteries
Vortex Optics AMG UH-1 Gen II Holographic Sight
23 Reviews
Vortex Optics AMG UH-1 Gen II Holographic Sight
  • The AMG UH-1 Gen II is a close-quarters solution built for military and law enforcement shooters, offering an incredibly fast holographic display to conquer any situation, now with four night-vision...
  • With the UH-1 Gen II, you get an improved sight picture through the enlarged viewing window, making target acquisition even faster, and easy battery changes with the toolless battery cover, plus a...
  • The lightning-quick EBR-CQB reticle is designed to dominate in close, and our FHQ technology virtually eliminates stray light emissions for zero forward signature.

EOTech 512

The 512 is a rugged optic that comes with an aluminum shell and a composite battery pack.

The aluminum shell wraps around the optic and leaves a slight space in between the important bits and the shield. The weight comes in at 11.5 OZ with a magnification of X1.

It also has 20 brightness settings to choose from.

Another bonus is that it is waterproof in up to 10 feet of water and is fog proof.

This makes it perfect — like the Burris AR-536 — for those close to mid-range engagements while keeping it reliable in extreme environments. 

EOTech 512

The reticle is a 1 MOA center dot with a 68 MOA ring around it.

There are hash marks on the top, bottom, left, and right on the ring. The reticle is adjustable with turrets on the side of the optic. They are easily adjustable but are recessed in to prevent unwanted bumps.

The lens on the optic is big and allows for a large field of view. It still maintains unlimited eye relief despite its length.      

The glass is clear and coated for protection. Along with being scratch-resistant, it is anti-reflective for discreet use.

This optic is absolute co-witnessed. This means that when the iron sights are flipped up, they will line up with the reticle on the optic. This makes sighting in the optic much easier if the iron sights are already zeroed. 

The battery pack on this optic is impressive as well.

It uses AA batteries and can last from 600 to 1000 hours depending on the type of battery used. This is ideal because the AA battery is the most common battery around.

This fact makes this optic ideal for preppers and survivalists that want a more universal option when powering a red dot. 

The downside is the AA batteries are long and make the optic a little bulkier. Notably, the battery spring can wear out after a lot of use but there are replacement parts for it.    

The Eotech 512 mounts on standard picatinny rails and 1” weaver rails. It also comes with a 10-year warranty (and don’t forget to save the receipt). 

Pros:

  • Clear glass
  • Great battery life
  • Clear sight picture
  • Absolute co-witness
  • Fast target acquisition

Cons:

  • A bit bulky and long (compared to other red dots)
EOTECH 512 Holographic Sight
746 Reviews
EOTECH 512 Holographic Sight
  • EOTECH 512.A65 - Holographic Sight in Black with 68 MOA ring & 1 MOA dot reticle
  • Mount - Compatible with both 1" Weaver and MIL-STD 1913 Rails
  • Adjustable Brightness - The 512 has 20 brightness settings for use in any lighting scenario

Which is Better Vortex Razor AMG UH-1 or Eotech 512?

After doing the Vortex Razor AMG UH-1 vs. Eotech 512 review, I’d say the clear champion is the Vortex UH-1

Vortex Razor AMG UH-1 vs. Eotech 512 Review

Here’s why…

  1. More compact
  2. Has a rechargeable port
  3. Larger field of view (FOV) 
  4. I prefer the EBR-CQB Reticle
  5. Lifetime warranty that is transferable

With all the said, the Eotech 512 is still a competitive optic that has its merits. But between these two battle horses, the trophy is handed to the Vortex UH-1.

Vortex Optics AMG UH-1 Gen II Holographic Sight
23 Reviews
Vortex Optics AMG UH-1 Gen II Holographic Sight
  • The AMG UH-1 Gen II is a close-quarters solution built for military and law enforcement shooters, offering an incredibly fast holographic display to conquer any situation, now with four night-vision...
  • With the UH-1 Gen II, you get an improved sight picture through the enlarged viewing window, making target acquisition even faster, and easy battery changes with the toolless battery cover, plus a...
  • The lightning-quick EBR-CQB reticle is designed to dominate in close, and our FHQ technology virtually eliminates stray light emissions for zero forward signature.

That said, which optic would you go for? Let me know in the comments down below. Also, if you’re in the market looking for a budget friendly short-to-medium range scope, check out my Strike Eagle review here. Or my Primary Arms and Strike Eagle comparison.

1 thought on “Vortex Razor AMG UH-1 vs. Eotech 512 [Review]”

  1. Eh $575 vs $399 is a bit more than a $50 difference as most local shops sell the EOtech 512 for $399 and the Vortex UH-1 is typically $500+ so the warranty might be worth the extra price. I’ve never owned either so I really can’t comment on this but just wanted to point out that the price difference is closer to $150 than $50.

    Reply

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